SINAPSE Virtual Happy Hour May 19, 2021 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM — Virtual Happy Hour (online)
9th Annual Scottish Radiotherapy Research Forum Jun 03, 2021 12:30 PM - 05:00 PM — Virtual Meeting (online)
Scottish Dementia Research Consortium Annual Conference 2021 Jun 16, 2021 10:00 AM - 03:30 PM — Virtual Meeting (online)
Medical Imaging Convention [rescheduled] Sep 15, 2021 - Sep 16, 2021 — National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, England
2021 SINAPSE ASM Sep 16, 2021 - Sep 17, 2021 — Technology & Innovation Centre, University of Strathclyde, 99 George Street, Glasgow

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Insight into ECT

March 2012 - Researchers find that ECT reduces frontal cortical connectivity in severe depressive disorder

For insight into ECT news item

A multidisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists at the universities of Aberdeen and Dundee have shown for the first time that successful treatment of severe depression with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) alters the brain’s functional connectivity in a lasting way. Professor Christian Schwarzbauer, SINAPSE Chair in Neuroimaging, said: “Despite being used successfully in clinical practice around the world for more than 70 years, the underlying mechanisms of ECT have so far remained unclear. Our findings do not only reveal the mechanism of action of ECT, but also provide further evidence that severe depression is linked to functional hyperconnectivity. In the longer term, these findings may lead to the development of new drug targets and therapies.” The original study was published in PNAS and attracted widespread interest in the national and international media. For further information see, Science or TIME magazine.

 

SINAPSE PhD student Susanne Merz was involved in the development of a new functional connectivity analysis method that was applied in this study to investigate how more than 25,000 areas in the brain ‘communicated’ with each other in severely depressed patients. Professor Dave Wyper, SINAPSE Director, said: “SINAPSE provides a fantastic environment for PhD students to be actively involved in cutting-edge multidisciplinary research”. Over the years, SINAPSE has successfully attracted many outstanding students from all over the world.