Through the Looking Glass: Breaking Barriers in STEM Oct 28, 2020 12:00 PM - 03:30 PM — Virtual Meeting (online)
NRS Mental Health Network Annual Scientific Meeting 2020 Nov 04, 2020 09:00 AM - 05:30 PM — Virtual Meeting (online)
Scottish Radiological Society Annual General Meeting 2020 Nov 06, 2020 09:30 AM - 03:30 PM — Virtual Meeting (online)
IPEM educational meeting: Artificial Intelligence in MRI Nov 18, 2020 12:00 AM — Virtual Meeting (online)

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Associations of Clinical Stroke Misclassification ('Clinical-Imaging Dissociation') in Acute Ischemic Stroke

Author(s): G. Potter, F. Doubal, C. Jackson, C. Sudlow, M. Dennis, J. Wardlaw

Abstract:
Background: Up to 20% of lacunar infarcts are clinically misdiagnosed as cortical infarcts and vice versa. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear. We assessed clinical and imaging features which might explain this 'clinical-imaging dissociation' (C-ID). Methods: Patients with an acute stroke syndrome (cortical or lacunar) underwent magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We recorded DWI-positive infarcts and proximity to cortex for small subcortical infarcts. We examined factors associated with C-ID. Results: 137 patients with a mild cortical or lacunar syndrome had an acute ischemic lesion on DWI. Of these, 21/93 (23%) with a cortical syndrome had an acute lacunar infarct and 7/44 (16%) with a lacunar syndrome had an acute cortical infarct. From 72 patients with an acute lacunar infarct on DWI, lesion proximity to cortex (odds ratio (OR) 14.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-130.1), left hemisphere location (OR 8.95, 95% CI 1.23-64.99) and diabetes (OR 17.1, 95% CI 1.49-196.16) predicted C-ID. On multivariate analysis of all 137 patients, C-ID was associated with diabetes (OR 7.12, 95% CI 1.86-27.2). Conclusions: C-ID occurs in a fifth of patients with mild stroke. Lacunar infarcts lying close to cortex are more likely to cause cortical symptoms. Diabetes is associated with any clinical-imaging mismatch. Stroke misclassification which can arise with clinical classification alone should be minimized in research by verification with high-sensitivity imaging. Copyright (C) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1015-9770
Publication Year: 2010
Periodical: Cerebrovascular Diseases
Periodical Number: 4
Volume: 29
Pages: 395-402
Author Address: Wardlaw, J Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Dept Clin Neurosci, SFC Brain Imaging Res Ctr, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Dept Clin Neurosci, SFC Brain Imaging Res Ctr, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland