PET/MR User's Meeting: Technical challenges Feb 05, 2020 10:30 AM - 03:00 PM — Henry Wellcome Auditorium, 183 Euston Road, London
Launch event for Aberdeen Hub of One HealthTech Feb 13, 2020 06:00 PM - 09:00 PM — ONE Tech Hub, Schoolhill, Aberdeen
Scottish Ophthalmic Imaging Society meeting Feb 14, 2020 09:30 AM - 05:00 PM — Royal Society of Edinburgh, 22-26 George Street, Edinburgh
Scottish+ Radiotherapy Physics Meeting 2020 Feb 21, 2020 09:30 AM - 05:00 PM — Scottish Health Service Centre , Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
2nd Scottish Ultrasound Annual Scientific Meeting Feb 28, 2020 10:00 AM - 05:00 PM — Collins Building, University of Strathclyde

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Grey matter changes over time in high risk subjects developing schizophrenia

Author(s): D. E. Job, H. C. Whalley, E. C. Johnstone, S. M. Lawrie

Abstract:
Schizophrenia affects approximately 1% of the population and is associated with reductions in brain volume, but when these are first evident is unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated abnormalities of brain structure, particularly of the temporal lobes, in schizophrenia. A study of brain structure in individuals destined to develop schizophrenia, before they do so, is crucial to understanding the illness. We used Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) to map changes in Grey Matter Density (GMD) in 65 young adults at high risk of schizophrenia, for familial reasons, and 19 healthy young adults, over a period of approximately 2 years. All subjects were anti-psychotic naive at both scans. No increases in GMD were found in any of the groups. Within the high-risk group significant declines in GMD were found in the temporal lobes, the right frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. In the control group a decline was found in the right gyrus rectus. No significant differences over time were found between any of the groups. Those individuals at high risk who had transient or isolated psychotic symptoms showed a different spatial pattern of reductions in GMD than those who did not in within group comparisons. In addition, those individuals at high risk who later developed schizophrenia also showed a different spatial pattern of reductions in GMD in the left temporal lobe and right cerebellum, from 2 to 3 years before they were diagnosed. These particular reductions may therefore be able to predict the later onset of schizophrenia.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1053-8119 (Print) 1053-8119 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2005
Periodical: Neuroimage
Periodical Number: 4
Volume: 25
Pages: 1023-30
Author Address: Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, The Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Morningside Park, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, Scotland, UK. djob@staffmail.ed.ac.uk