PET/MR User's Meeting: Technical challenges Feb 05, 2020 10:30 AM - 03:00 PM — Henry Wellcome Auditorium, 183 Euston Road, London
Launch event for Aberdeen Hub of One HealthTech Feb 13, 2020 06:00 PM - 09:00 PM — ONE Tech Hub, Schoolhill, Aberdeen
Scottish Ophthalmic Imaging Society meeting Feb 14, 2020 09:30 AM - 05:00 PM — Royal Society of Edinburgh, 22-26 George Street, Edinburgh
Scottish+ Radiotherapy Physics Meeting 2020 Feb 21, 2020 09:30 AM - 05:00 PM — Scottish Health Service Centre , Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

How often is haemosiderin not visible on routine MRI following traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage?

Author(s): J. M. Wardlaw, P. F. X. Statham

Abstract:
Intracerebral haemorrhage may be visible indefinitely on MRI, due to persistence of haemosiderin in macrophages around the lesion, but it is not clear whether all haemorrhages produce haemosiderin or, if not, what proportion cannot be identified as former haemorrhages on routine MRI. We performed routine MRI (spin-echo T2- and proton-density weighted images) in 116 survivors of moderate to severe head injury, 1-5 years after injury. We reviewed the images blindly and correlated them with CT in the acute stage, to determine how many haemorrhages from the acute stage were identifiable by virtue of haemosiderin deposition on late MRI. Of 106 haemorrhages in 78 patients on CT at the time of injury, 96 (90 %) were visible as haemosiderin on late MRI. Of the old haemorrhages without haemosiderin, seven of ten were in patients where another haemorrhage with haemosiderin was still visible elsewhere in the brain. No patient or haemorrhage features explained the formation or absence of haemosiderin. Thus about 10 % of definite haematomas show no trace of haemosiderin on routine spin-echo MRI. Radiologists should be alerted to supplement routine spin-echo with gradient-echo sequences if there is a reason to suspect, or specifically exclude, prior haemorrhage.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 0028-3940
Publication Year: 2000
Periodical: Neuroradiology
Periodical Number: 2
Volume: 42
Pages: 81-84
Author Address: