9th SINAPSE Neuro-oncology Imaging Meeting [rescheduled] Mar 11, 2021 09:30 AM - 03:30 PM — West Park Conferencing & Events, 319 Perth Road, Dundee DD2 1NN
Total Body PET 2020 conference [rescheduled] Jun 05, 2021 - Jun 07, 2021 — McEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh
Medical Imaging Convention [rescheduled] Sep 15, 2021 - Sep 16, 2021 — National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, England

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Gaze Perception Develops Atypically in Children with Autism

Author(s): S. Webster, D. Potter

Abstract:
The Mindblindness model is the main model of social cognitive development in autism. This model assumes that eye direction detection and eye contact detection develop typically in autism (Baron-Cohen, 1995). The model's assumption of maturational development implies that when these skills are abnormal, they must either be absent or developmentally delayed. In contrast, the atypical modularisation hypothesis predicts that these skills can develop deviantly—successfully but atypically—in children with autism. Two computer-based tasks were used to assess eye direction detection and eye contact detection in children with autism and in typically developing children. These skills were developmentally deviant in children with autism. The findings support a model of social cognition in autism that accounts for developmental processes.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 2090-3995
Publication Year: 2011
Periodical: Child Development Research
Periodical Number:
Volume:
Pages:
Author Address: School of Psychology, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, Scotland