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eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Orbital prefrontal cortex volume predicts social network size: an imaging study of individual differences in humans

Author(s): J. Powell, P. A. Lewis, N. Roberts, M. Garcia-Finana, R. I. Dunbar

Abstract:
The social brain hypothesis, an explanation for the unusually large brains of primates, posits that the size of social group typical of a species is directly related to the volume of its neocortex. To test whether this hypothesis also applies at the within-species level, we applied the Cavalieri method of stereology in conjunction with point counting on magnetic resonance images to determine the volume of prefrontal cortex (PFC) subfields, including dorsal and orbital regions. Path analysis in a sample of 40 healthy adult humans revealed a significant linear relationship between orbital (but not dorsal) PFC volume and the size of subjects' social networks that was mediated by individual intentionality (mentalizing) competences. The results support the social brain hypothesis by indicating a relationship between PFC volume and social network size that applies within species, and, more importantly, indicates that the relationship is mediated by social cognitive skills.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1471-2954 (Electronic) 0962-8452 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2012
Periodical: Proc Biol Sci
Periodical Number: 1736
Volume: 279
Pages: 2157-62
Author Address: Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK.