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CAFACHEM 2020 Summer School on Organic & Halogen Radiochemistry Aug 25, 2020 - Aug 28, 2020 — KCL Waterloo Campus, London
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eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Brain white matter damage in aging and cognitive ability in youth and older age

Author(s): M. D. V. Hernandez, T. Booth, C. Murray, A. J. Gow, L. Penke, Z. Morris, S. M. Maniega, N. A. Royle, B. S. Aribisala, M. E. Bastin, J. M. Starr, I. J. Deary, J. M. Wardlaw

Abstract:
Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) reflect accumulating white matter damage with aging and impair cognition. The role of childhood intelligence is rarely considered in associations between cognitive impairment and WMH. We studied community-dwelling older people all born in 1936, in whom IQ had been assessed at age 11 years. We assessed medical histories, current cognitive ability and quantified WMH on MR imaging. Among 634 participants, mean age 72.7 (SD 0.7), age 11 IQ was the strongest predictor of late life cognitive ability. After accounting for age 11 IQ, greater WMH load was significantly associated with lower late life general cognitive ability (beta = -0.14, p < 0.01) and processing speed (beta = -0.19, p < 0.001). WMH were also associated independently with lower age 11 IQ (beta = -0.08, p < 0.05) and hypertension. In conclusion, having more WMH is significantly associated with lower cognitive ability, after accounting for prior ability, age 11IQ. Early-life IQ also influenced WMH in later life. Determining how lower IQ in youth leads to increasing brain damage with aging is important for future successful cognitive aging. (C) 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 0197-4580
Publication Year: 2013
Periodical: Neurobiology of Aging
Periodical Number: 12
Volume: 34
Pages: 2740-2747
Author Address: Wardlaw, JM Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Dept Clin Neurosci, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Univ Edinburgh, Dept Psychol, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Univ Edinburgh, Dept Geriatr Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland Heriot Watt Univ, Dept Psychol, Sch Life Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Lagos State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Lagos, Nigeria