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Online Short Courses

Altered amygdala connectivity within the social brain in schizophrenia

Author(s): P. Mukherjee, H. C. Whalley, J. W. McKirdy, R. Sprengelmeyer, A. W. Young, A. M. McIntosh, S. M. Lawrie, J. Hall

Abstract:
Background: Impairments in social cognition have been described in schizophrenia and relate to core symptoms of the disorder. Social cognition is subserved by a network of brain regions, many of which have been implicated in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that deficits in connectivity between components of this social brain network may underlie the social cognition impairments seen in the disorder. Methods: We investigated brain activation and connectivity in a group of individuals with schizophrenia making social judgments of approachability from faces (n = 20), compared with a group of matched healthy volunteers (n = 24), using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Effective connectivity from the amygdala was estimated using the psychophysiological interaction approach. Results: While making approachability judgments, healthy participants recruited a network of social brain regions including amygdala, fusiform gyrus, cerebellum, and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally and left medial prefrontal cortex. During the approachability task, healthy participants showed increased connectivity from the amygdala to the fusiform gyri, cerebellum, and left superior frontal cortex. In comparison to controls, individuals with schizophrenia overactivated the right middle frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, and precuneus and had reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the insula cortex. Discussion: We report increased activation of frontal and medial parietal regions during social judgment in patients with schizophrenia, accompanied by decreased connectivity between the amygdala and insula. We suggest that the increased activation of frontal control systems and association cortex may reflect a compensatory mechanism for impaired connectivity of the amygdala with other parts of the social brain networks in schizophrenia.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1745-1701 (Electronic)0586-7614 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2013
Periodical: Schizophr Bull
Periodical Number: 1
Volume: 40
Pages: 152-60
Author Address: *To whom correspondence should be addressed; Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2500, US; tel: 773-916-7662, fax: 631-632-7876, e-mail: prerona.mukherjee@stonybrook.edu.