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eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Positive impact of pre-stroke surgery on survival following transient focal ischemia in hypertensive rats

Author(s): E. N. Ord, R. Shirley, J. C. van Kralingen, A. Graves, J. D. McClure, M. Wilkinson, C. McCabe, I. M. Macrae, L. M. Work

Abstract:
We describe a positive influence of pre-stroke surgery on recovery and survival in a commonly used experimental stroke model. Two groups of male, stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs) underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Group 1 underwent the procedure without any prior intervention whilst group 2 had an additional general anaesthetic 6 days prior to tMCAO for a cranial burrhole and durotomy. Post-stroke recovery was assessed using a 32 point neurological deficit score and tapered beam walk and infarct volume determined from haematoxylin-eosin stained sections. In group 2 survival was 92% (n=12) versus 67% in group 1 (n=18). In addition, post-tMCAO associated weight loss was significantly reduced in group 2. There was no significant difference between the two groups in experimental outcomes: infarct volume (Group 1 317+/-18.6 mm(3) versus Group 2 332+/-20.4 mm(3)), and serial (day 0-14 post-tMCAO) neurological deficit scores and tapered-beam walk test. Drilling a cranial burrhole under general anaesthesia prior to tMCAO in SHRSP reduced mortality and gave rise to infarct volumes and neurological deficits similar to those recorded in surviving Group 1 animals. This methodological refinement has significant implications for animal welfare and group sizes required for intervention studies.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1872-678X (Electronic)0165-0270 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2012
Periodical: J Neurosci Methods
Periodical Number: 2
Volume: 211
Pages: 305-8
Author Address: Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.