Medical Imaging Convention [rescheduled] Mar 09, 2021 - Mar 10, 2021 — National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, England
9th SINAPSE Neuro-oncology Imaging Meeting [rescheduled] Mar 11, 2021 09:30 AM - 03:30 PM — West Park Conferencing & Events, 319 Perth Road, Dundee DD2 1NN
Total Body PET 2020 conference [rescheduled] Jun 05, 2021 - Jun 07, 2021 — McEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Blood-brain barrier permeability and long-term clinical and imaging outcomes in cerebral small vessel disease

Author(s): J. M. Wardlaw, F. N. Doubal, M. Valdes-Hernandez, X. Wang, F. M. Chappell, K. Shuler, P. A. Armitage, T. C. Carpenter, M. S. Dennis

Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability occurs in cerebral small vessel disease. It is not known if BBB changes predate progression of small vessel disease. METHODS: We followed-up patients with nondisabling lacunar or cortical stroke and BBB permeability magnetic resonance imaging after their original stroke. Approximately 3 years later, we assessed functional outcome (Oxford Handicap Score, poor outcome defined as 3-6), recurrent neurological events, and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) progression on magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Among 70 patients with mean age of 68 (SD +/- 11) years, median time to clinical follow-up was 39 months (interquartile range, 30-45) and median Oxford Handicap Score was 2 (interquartile range, 1-3); poor functional outcome was associated with higher baseline WMH score (P<0.001) and increased basal ganglia BBB permeability (P=0.046). Among 48 patients with follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, WMH progression at follow-up was associated with baseline WMH (ANCOVA P<0.0001) and age (ANCOVA P=0.032). CONCLUSIONS: Further long-term studies to evaluate the role of BBB dysfunction in progression of small vessel disease are required in studies that are large enough to account for key prognostic influences such as baseline WMH and age.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1524-4628 (Electronic)0039-2499 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2012
Periodical: Stroke
Periodical Number: 2
Volume: 44
Pages: 525-7
Author Address: Brain Research Imaging Center, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Joanna.wardlaw@ed.ac.uk