Medical Imaging Convention [rescheduled] Mar 09, 2021 - Mar 10, 2021 — National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, England
9th SINAPSE Neuro-oncology Imaging Meeting [rescheduled] Mar 11, 2021 09:30 AM - 03:30 PM — West Park Conferencing & Events, 319 Perth Road, Dundee DD2 1NN
Total Body PET 2020 conference [rescheduled] Jun 05, 2021 - Jun 07, 2021 — McEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh

eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the ageing brain

Author(s): Susana Munoz-Maniega, Maria Valdes Hernandez, Jonathan D. Clayden, Natalie Royle, Catherine Murray, Zoe Morris, Benjamin Aribisala, Alan Gow, John Starr, Mark Bastin, Ian Deary, Joanna Wardlaw

Abstract:
White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p < 0.0001), with MD providing the largest difference between NAWM and WMH. Receiver operating characteristic analysis on each biomarker showed that MD differentiated best between NAWM and WMH, identifying 94.6% of the lesions using a threshold of 0.747 × 10−9 m2s−1 (area under curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975–0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 0197-4580
Publication Year: 2014
Periodical: Neurobiology of Aging
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