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eLearning

SINAPSE experts from around Scotland have developed ten online modules designed to explain medical imaging. They are freely available and are intended for non-specialists.


Edinburgh Imaging Academy at the University of Edinburgh offers the following online programmes through a virtual learning environment:

Neuroimaging for Research MSc/Dip/Cert

Imaging MSc/Dip/Cert

PET-MR Principles & Applications Cert

Applied Medical Image Analysis Cert

Online Short Courses

Mechanisms of sporadic cerebral small vessel disease: insights from neuroimaging

Author(s): J. M. Wardlaw, C. Smith, M. Dichgans

Abstract:
The term cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) describes a range of neuroimaging, pathological, and associated clinical features. Clinical features range from none, to discrete focal neurological symptoms (eg, stroke), to insidious global neurological dysfunction and dementia. The burden on public health is substantial. The pathogenesis of SVD is largely unknown. Although the pathological processes leading to the arteriolar disease are associated with vascular risk factors and are believed to result from an intrinsic cerebral arteriolar occlusive disease, little is known about how these processes result in brain disease, how SVD lesions contribute to neurological or cognitive symptoms, and the association with risk factors. Pathology often shows end-stage disease, which makes identification of the earliest stages difficult. Neuroimaging provides considerable insights; although the small vessels are not easily seen themselves, the effects of their malfunction on the brain can be tracked with detailed brain imaging. We discuss potential mechanisms, detectable with neuroimaging, that might better fit the available evidence and provide testable hypotheses for future study.

Full version: Available here

Click the link to go to an external website with the full version of the paper


ISBN: 1474-4465 (Electronic) 1474-4422 (Linking)
Publication Year: 2013
Periodical: Lancet Neurol
Periodical Number: 5
Volume: 12
Pages: 483-97
Author Address: Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. joanna.wardlaw@ed.ac.uk